Not-So-Easy Rider

For Fresh Fiction, I wrote a post about the, um, ambivalence toward bikes shared by me and my heroine, Sarah.


“I need to learn to ride a bike.” Sarah didn’t try to hide her grimace. “By the middle of next week. Even though riding one of those things is basically daring God to smite me.”

That’s the opening of Ready to Fall, my fourth Lovestruck Librarians book. Now, I will freely admit that my heroine, Sarah Mayhew, has a flair for hyperbole. She’s earned her nickname DQ (for Drama Queen) among her friends honestly. But in this instance…well…

I can’t help but agree with her.

unhappy woman with defect bike

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The Call of the Wild: Rejected

To celebrate the release of Ready to Fall, I wrote a few blog posts about my inspirations for the story and what I love about it. Novels Alive featured this post, in which I discuss my heroine’s hostility toward nature and why I sympathize with her. (Hint: I WANT INDOOR PLUMBING.)

Portrait of young reflective woman

I wanted to find a picture of a woman glaring at trees. This was as close as I could get. (I like to imagine there’s an infuriating oak just out of frame.)

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My MAYDAY Interview with Cynthia Woolf

Cynthia Woolf graciously invited me onto her blog and talked to me about my books, my writing process, and my beloved critique partner, Mia Sosa!

Tell us a little about yourself and your latest book.
Hello! My name is Olivia Dade, and my third Lovestruck Librarians book, Mayday, comes out May 10. It’s a contemporary romantic comedy full of sex, banter, and assorted nerdery, set in and around the Downtown Niceville Library. In fact, the heroines of my entire Lovestruck Librarians series all work in the same Maryland library system.

The whole library connection isn’t a shock, considering that I worked at a public library for five years. Before that, I taught high school and led tours through Colonial Williamsburg. So basically, I’ve held lots of jobs that required me to feign a certain level of decorum I don’t actually possess. Now I don’t need to pretend anymore. Such a relief!

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Starting Over

NOTE: I originally wrote this post for Manic Readers.


Some people sail through their lives, certain from a young age about what they want from their existence and their work, sure where they belong and what they’re meant to do.

I’m not one of those people.

For a long time, though, I thought I was. From seventh grade until the age of twenty-four, I knew I would become a university professor, beloved and wise as I taught in front of rapt students and researched fascinating subjects. I would be intellectually challenged, part of a community, and happy. Above all else, happy.

Then, halfway through my American History Ph.D. program, everything changed.

Girl comforting her friendAs it turned out, I wasn’t happy. I wasn’t sure anymore that I wanted to spend my adult life battling for my place in academia. So I left a semester after earning my master’s degree, moved back home with my mother, and applied for a full-time position at the living history museum where I’d been working during my school breaks.

And I floundered. For years. I had no idea anymore what I wanted to do with my life. I searched for a new calling at an array of jobs: living history interpreter, high school teacher, student tutor, bakery clerk, and librarian. For a woman who’d thought she knew her life path from seventh grade, the upheaval was disorienting and upsetting. Worse, that upheaval didn’t uncover a new calling.

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My Enduring Love for Elizabeth Peters & Her Shameless, Flawed Heroines

I wrote this post for Deanna Raybourn’s blog, and I did so delightedly. I kind of worship Elizabeth Peters.


When Deanna told me I could crash her online party today, I basically imploded with glee. Here’s why:

1. I adore her writing, both in book and tweet form. In fact—and she doesn’t know this, because I try to hide my rampant fangirling whenever possible—I featured her books in pretty much every display I created as a librarian.

A display to highlight RITA award-winning authors? Check!

A display showcasing mysteries solved by couples? Check!

A display introducing patrons to steampunk? Ch—

Wait. Not that one, I guess. But if I could have figured out a connection, I’d have slapped Deanna’s books up there too.

2. Because I write contemporary romantic comedies, I don’t usually get to discuss my favorite mystery authors. Not even those authors who, like Deanna and Elizabeth Peters, drizzle some romance onto their stories.

3. This post gave me a legitimate, professional excuse to reread Peters’ Crocodile on the Sandbank and Summer of the Dragon for approximately the millionth time each. And by complete coincidence, our daughter needed a chaperone for a classmate’s birthday party the day I reread them.

My husband: “I thought you were working on a blog post? Because if not, maybe you’d like to take our daughter to the birthday par—”

Me: “Totally working on a blog post! Researching so hard.”

My husband [side-eyeing me as I clambered happily onto my reading chaise]: “Hmph.”

So thank you, Deanna. I appreciate any excuse to avoid enclosed spaces filled with screaming six-year-olds! ::clears throat:: I mean, I appreciate the opportunity to talk about one of my all-time favorite authors and two of my desert island books!

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